COVID-19 Resources and Update

COVID-19 Resources and Update

For the full list of resources visit 
covid19.colorado.gov and COHouseDems.com

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FRAUD WATCH: A number of bogus products are being circulated as COVID-19 cures. At this time, there is no cure for COVID-19.
Remember, scammers follow headlines.
Visit StopFraudColorado.gov for more information.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS: We’re fortunate to have several organizations in JeffCo that are working to provide food to those who need it. In order to continue providing this essential service, they need volunteers or donations. Stay-at-home and workplace restrictions do not apply to volunteers at these organizations. Please visit one or more of the following websites to see how you can help feed our community: 
The Action Center * ECCHO * JeffCoEats * Mountain Resource Center * Food Bank of the Rockies
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If you are a medical or public health professional, you can sign up to volunteer here.
To donate or volunteer in another capacity, visit HelpColoradoNow.org.

If you have urgent questions regarding COVID-19, please contact the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE). 

Phone: CO-HELP: 303-389-1687 or 1-877-462-2911

Email: COHELP@RMPDC.org

COVID-19 symptoms include coughing, fever, and shortness of breath. If you have symptoms and believe that you may be exposed, please contact a health care provider immediately. 

COVID-19 Resources for Colorado

Jefferson County Resources

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Neighbors and Friends,

You’ve probably heard that Governor Polis declared a state of emergency in Colorado to address COVID-19 (coronavirus). The Colorado General Assembly has been doing everything in its power to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in Colorado and protect those who have come in contact with coronavirus. We are working closely with the Governor’s office to take swift and necessary actions as we continue to monitor COVID-19 in our communities, state, country, and across the world. 

This is an uncertain time to say the least, and I know that most of us have never experienced anything like it in our lifetimes. That said, we will be able to minimize the harm and protect our most vulnerable populations by taking smart precautions and following the advice of experts. We will all need to make short term sacrifices, but by working together, we’re going to pull through this together.

One of the measures that the General Assembly found necessary was pausing the legislative session for at least two weeks. We are scheduled to reconvene on March 30, 2020. The Capitol building is closed today and tomorrow for cleaning. It will reopen on Wednesday, March 18, 2020, but public tours are not available until further notice. The Lakewood legislators have also decided to cancel our Town Hall that was scheduled for March 28, 2020.

If you have urgent questions regarding COVID-19, please contact the Colorado Department of Public Health and the Environment (CDPHE). 

COVID-19 symptoms include coughing, fever, and shortness of breath. If you have symptoms and believe that you may be exposed, please contact a health care provider immediately. 

According to the CDPHE, certain people are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, including:

  • People over the age of 60, especially those over 80
  • People who have chronic medical conditions (heart, lung, or kidney disease; diabetes)

Individuals who are at higher risk should avoid crowds and practice social distancing. Regardless of your risk level, please review the recommended prevention strategies below:

  • Frequently and thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If no tissues are available, use your inner elbow or sleeve.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home if you’re sick and keep your children home if they are sick.
  • Clean surfaces in your home and personal items such as cell phones.

We are facing this uncertainty together and it is crucial that we all do our part to protect each other. As always, please do not hesitate to contact me with your concerns and questions: call (303) 866-2951 or email chris.kennedy.house@gmail.com

Thank you for staying safe,

Chris

P.S. For any of you who were elected delegates to your county assembly/convention, the General Assembly passed emergency legislation to give the parties the ability to allow remote participation or mail voting. Please look for information from your county party soon on how to participate.

Caucus is one week away!

Caucus is one week away!

With everything going on at the capitol, I have to admit I’ve barely given any thought to the precinct caucuses coming up on Saturday, March 7th at 2:00pm. Fortunately, we have  a wonderful team of volunteers working incredibly hard to get everything ready to go!

Many voters have expressed confusion about why caucus is still happening since we’ve moved to a presidential primary this year. Before I tell you, I want to make sure you’ve all already returned your primary ballots. If not, drop them off by 7:00pm on Tuesday, March 3rd at any of Jeffco’s several locations (or if you’re not in Jeffco, google your county clerk’s website). If you’re struggling to make up your mind, you can read about my endorsement of Elizabeth Warren here. I continue to believe she’s the most thoughtful, bold, sincere, and electable candidate running.

Back to caucus. Here’s the deal. Colorado still gives candidates two paths to get their names on the June primary ballot. Candidates may either collect petition signatures or go through the caucus-assembly process. If the latter, delegates elected at caucus will attend county, congressional district, and state assemblies to nominate those candidates (as well as to elect delegates to the national convention based on the results of the presidential primary). That’s how I’m running this year, and that’s how many of the candidates for US Senate are running, too.

Caucuses will elect delegates this year based on their preference in the US Senate race, and I’ll be caucusing for Andrew Romanoff. While I like and respect John Hickenlooper, I believe we need more courageous leadership in the US Senate in the years ahead. I’m hopeful that we will defeat Trump this November, but it’s unlikely we’ll have 60 votes in the Senate to pass any significant legislation. That’s why we need a US Senator who’s not afraid to say that the filibuster is outdated and must be abolished. Andrew was a master legislator during his eight years in the Colorado House of Representatives, and he’s a strong supporter of Medicare for All and the Green New Deal. This is no time for small solutions. We need courageous leadership to get our country back on track. And yes, I’m confident Andrew will be able to defeat Cory Gardner this November.

This is an exciting time to be involved in politics, and if you’re not yet involved, now’s the time. So many of the events of the last few years have been deeply troubling, but we’ve seen the way local action can bring about big changes. When voters in 2018 elected Democratic majorities in the State House and Senate, we passed significant legislation in so many policy areas and we’re already seeing the way those reforms have improved the lives of hard-working Coloradans. We can do the same thing in 2020 by electing a Democratic President, and Democratic US Senator for Colorado, and holding on to our Democratic House Majority. Change is in the air, and now is the time for us to do the work to persuade and turn out the voters of Colorado to support a vision for the future that gives real opportunities to everyone who works hard and does their fair share, ensures basic human rights, and protects our environment for the next generation.

I’ll look forward to seeing you at caucus!

Chris

P.S.  I want to specifically recognize the hard work of Theresa Tomich, Chair of the HD23 Democrats, who is running the show at our caucus location (Carmody Middle School) this year. She and her team have been working so hard for weeks to make sure everything runs smoothly next weekend. These events wouldn’t be possible without amazing volunteers like Theresa.L



Live in HD23?
If you live in my district, here’s where our caucus will be meeting:

When: Sat. March 7th, 2:00-4:00pm
Where: Carmody Middle School (2050 S Kipling St, Lakewood)

FInd other Jeffco caucus locations here or other Colorado locations here.


Links
About Me
My Priorities
Find Your Precinct #
Find Your Caucus Location
General Caucus Q&A

Iowa Schmiowa!

Iowa Schmiowa!

I don’t know about you, but I can’t get enough of the news about the Democratic presidential primary. So much is at stake for the future of our country, and I’m feeling very invested in putting forward a candidate who can defeat Donald Trump and get our government back into the business of solving problems and making life better for the hard-working familes across our country.

Every Democrat on the debate stage is more qualified and has more integrity than the current occupant of the White House, and come November, I’ll be proud to support any one of them. But I really, REALLY, hope it’s Senator Elizabeth Warren.

Here’s why.

  1. Beating Trump is the #1 priority, and I believe Elizabeth Warren is the most electable candidate. She is an incredibly powerful communicator, and she speaks directly to the people who are feeling most left behind–including those in the midwestern swing states.
  2. Her policy ideas are bold, thoughtful, and thorough. Seriously. Just read any one of her plans. She certainly took some heat in the press over elements of her health care plan, but I read it twice and I can tell you she knows her stuff. She recognizes we cannot solve the big problems without disrupting the status quo, and she also establishes realistic steps and timelines.
  3. She has a real theory of change that starts with tackling corruption in Washington. Debate moderators have asked numerous times how candidates would accomplish their policy goals if elected, and I find Warren’s theory most compelling. That’s because I’ve experienced the power of special interests first hand. There are days at the state capitol where I can’t walk down the hall without bumping into a dozen insurance lobbyists, a dozen hospital lobbyists, and a dozen pharma lobbyists. And most of the time, their efforts are directed towards blocking progressive change.
  4. Elizabeth Warren is a fighter for regular people who are just trying to get good jobs, support their families, and afford health care, housing, child care, and higher education. After four years of Trump, that’s what we need in the White House.

I could go on, but instead I’ll just ask you to reply to this email and tell me about the candidate you support and why. And if you share my admiration for Elizabeth Warren, would you sign up to volunteer for her campaign?

The Iowa caucus is Monday, February 3rd. But before we see the results of the New Hampshire primary at 7:00pm EST on Tuesday, February 11th, you will likely already have your Colorado presidential primary ballot in hand!

That’s right, we have a presidential primary in Colorado this year! Ballots are mailed out starting February 10th and are due back by 7:00pm on Tuesday, March 3rd.

FUN FACT: Because of a bill we passed last year, 17 year olds who will be 18 by the November 3rd General Election will be eligible to vote in primaries and caucuses this year! Register to vote here!

Keep in mind we’ll still have precinct caucuses on Saturday, March 7th. Delegates elected at caucus will participate in the nomination of all state and local candidates (including me!), and those who go on to the state convention will elect delegates to the national convention based on the results of the presidential primary.

With that, I hope you all have a wonderful and warm winter weekend in Colorado! And don’t forget to reply to tell me about who you’re excited to support to be our next President of the United States of America!

Thanks,
Chris

Another year, another chance to do some good

Another year, another chance to do some good

Happy New Year!

I’m always excited about the new opportunities a new year brings. Last year, we made remarkable progress on so many policies to help the people of Colorado. This year, we’re set to continue that progress with a twist – it’s an election year, so the temperature’s going to be even hotter than last year.

That said, I have a great deal of confidence in my colleagues. We showed that we’re willing to do the work, researching tough topics and engaging with stakeholders in diverse communities and across the political spectrum to create the best policies. As a result, 95% of the bills signed into law by Governor Polis last year passed with bipartisan support.

It should be no surprise, then, that the first bill we introduced this session has bipartisan sponsorship in both the House and the Senate. There has been a growing consensus about the response to the developing teen vaping epidemic, and while we passed good legislation to empower local governments to regulate tobacco retailers last year, we need to do more. I’ve been part of a working group all summer/fall that successfully reached bipartisan agreement on how to increase the purchase age to 21 across Colorado with appropriate enforcement of retailers and prohibitions on direct-to-consumer online sales. Check out House Bill 20-1001.

The interim also kept me quite busy with two interim committees: the Opioid & Other Substance Use Disorders (SUD) committee and the Investor-Owned Utilities (IOU) committee. I’ll be continuing that work this session by carrying several bills through the legislative process. For the SUD committee, I’m carrying five bills that continue the effort started in 2017 to curb Colorado’s opioid epidemic and build a functional treatment/recovery infrastructure. I’m particularly proud of a provision in the prevention bill that will require insurance companies to cover alternatives to opioids with limited copays.

On the IOU committee, I was excited to once again immerse myself into renewable energy policy – a topic on which my predecessor, Rep. Max Tyler, led the state for his seven years. I will be working on a few bills in the energy policy space this year.

Much of my work this session will continue to focus on health care costs. I’m so proud of what we accomplished last session, but costs are still out of control and we need to do more. I am very involved in conversations about continuing the reinsurance program and establishing a public option – both of which are coming under extreme pressure from hospitals and insurance companies, who have invested some of their multi-billion-dollar profits into TV and mail ad campaigns over the last few months. While these stakeholders may have important feedback on how we change policy, we can’t let their desire to protect the status quo trump the needs of the people who are struggling to afford the high cost of health care (not to mention the high costs of housing, higher education, child care, and more).

My first bill, however, is about protecting our democracy.Colorado led the nation in 2018 by passing two constitutional amendments to reform the redistricting process for congressional and state legislative districts. The districts will now be drawn by nonpartisan staff according to unbiased criteria, approved by independent commissions, and subject to clear rules about public meetings and judicial review. However, for county commissioner districts, there are no such rules. In most cases, this isn’t a huge problem because most Colorado counties elect their commissioners countywide. Still, in home-rule counties and/or counties larger than 70,000 people that have increased from three to five commissioners of which at least some are elected by individual districts, there is a risk of partisan gerrymandering. House Bill 20-1073 will reform this system by following the model of Amendments Y & Z.

It feels like there’s plenty more to say, but I think I’ve written enough words for one newsletter. More soon. Until then, please feel free to reach out about anything you need this session! And if you’d like to schedule a time to visit the Capitol, please contact my legislative aide, Jakki Davison, at cohd23aide@gmail.com

Thanks,
Chris

P.S.  Thanks to all of you who donated food and/or socks at our November town hall! We helped the Action Center break a world record when the collected 37,556 pairs of socks on one day!

Still optimistic after all these years

Still optimistic after all these years

It’s hard to believe this whirlwind of a year is nearly over. At the end of the landmark 2019 legislative session, I had to take a step back before I could fully appreciate everything we accomplished.

We passed legislation to lower the cost of health care; invest in education, transportation, and affordable housing; accelerate our transition to clean energy; make our schools safer; expand mental health access; reform our criminal justice system; fight the opioid epidemic; expand the rights of every Coloradan, including voting rights, reproductive rights, and rights to self-expression; and protect the clean air, clean water, and beautiful open spaces that make Colorado such a special place to live.

Years like this are why people run for office. When bills become laws and begin to impact people’s lives, we remember that our democratic republic often succeeds at expanding opportunities for people to live better, happier, and healthier lives – as long as we elect the right people.

Even when Americans are subjected to horrifying news nearly every day from the Trump administration, our progress here in Colorado keeps me feeling optimistic about the future.

Next session, we’ll be continuing our work on all of these issues, and believe me, it’s a lot of work. There will be obstacles and setbacks, lies and distortions, and a whole lot of money spent on lobbying and advertising by the defenders of the status quo. As soon as soon as the session ends in early May, my colleagues and I will be hitting the campaign trail again to talk to voters about the work we’ve done and ask for their support so we can keep moving Colorado forward.

On that note, it should be no surprise that I’m running for reelection in 2020! It’s been such an honor to represent the people of House District 23 and to help lead the state as the Assistant Majority Leader of the Colorado House of Representatives. Please join me for a Holiday Happy Hour & Fundraiser on December 17th to celebrate the progress we made for the people of Colorado this year and to prepare for another great year!

Together, we really can change the world for the better. Thank you for doing your part. I’ll certainly keep doing mine.

My 2019 Endorsements

Ballots were mailed out last week for the 2019 election. For those of you on my list who live outside of Lakewood or Jeffco, the rest of this email may not be very interesting, but you can read my positions on the statewide ballot measures here.

I know I’m a little late in announcing my endorsements for Lakewood City Council and Jeffco School Board, but I moderated a candidate forum last weekend and I decided to wait so that all candidates would feel they were treated fairly. But now that the forum is behind us, here are my 2019 endorsements:

Lakewood City Council
This year has been a contentious one with growth being the central issue on most voters’ minds. The candidates I’m endorsing have all expressed thoughtfulness about this issue. Rather than kneejerk reactions and faux-populist politics, these candidates will work to balance these growth concerns with other priorities like affordability, inclusivity, and sustainability.

Mayor – Adam Paul
Ward 1 – Kyra deGruy
Ward 2 – Sharon Vincent
Ward 3 – Henry Hollender
Ward 4 – Christopher Arlen
Ward 5 – Dana Gutwein

With the right leadership, I believe our city is capable of managing growth the right way while increasing access to affordable housing in the parts of Lakewood that need it the most. And I believe these candidates will truly prioritize sustainability and work to make sure Lakewood is doing it’s part to fight climate change.

There are also two municipal ballot measures in Lakewood this year, and I’m voting yes on both.

2F – I’m voting yes to modernize our trash/recycling system in Lakewood. We can have better service, lower cost, and fewer trash trucks driving up our streets every week if we just choose to work together rather than choosing to have everyone go it alone.

2G – I’m voting yes to give Lakewood future opportunities to create public-private partnerships to expand broadband access.

Jeffco School Board
After some turbulent years, Jeffco voters made a course correction in 2015. Since then, we’ve had a school board focused on working together for the benefit of Jeffco kids. I’m supporting candidates who will keep Jeffco moving forward.

District 3 – Stephanie Schooley
District 4 – Joan Chavez-Lee

Remember, these candidates run district-wide, so you can vote for one candidate in each district.

That’s all for now. Get more information about voting at https://www.jeffco.us/elections, or email me here at any time! Thanks for voting!!

I’m Voting Yes on CC, DD, & 1A

This November, I’m voting Yes on Proposition CC, Yes on Proposition DD, and Yes on Jeffco Question 1A.

Prop CC allows the state to keep revenues above the outdated TABOR formula to increase investments in K-12, higher education, and transportation. This formula is why Colorado is $2500 per kid below the national average in funding our public schools and why we haven’t been able to adequately maintain our transportation infrastructure. While Prop CC doesn’t solve all of our budget woes, it’s a big step in the right direction. Prop CC doesn’t raise tax rates; it just lets us keep what Coloradans have already paid. And we’ll know exactly where the dollars go with an annual, independent audit. Learn more at YesOnPropCC.com.

Prop DD legalizes sports betting in Colorado, imposes a new tax on casino profits, and uses the bulk of the new revenues to fund the Colorado Water Plan. The 2018 Supreme Court decision would have made online sports betting available in Colorado regardless of whether we took action, so it makes sense to allow Colorado businesses to participate and pay taxes on their new profits to fund a critical state priority – the future of our water supply. Learn more at YesOnDD.com.

Jeffco Question 1A is similar to Prop CC but for the county budget instead of the state. If 1A doesn’t pass, the same outdated budget formula will force huge cuts to public safety and other critical county services. And here’s another fun fact. If Prop CC passes, Jeffco will receive over $1M in transportation funding from the state next year – but we won’t get to keep it unless we also pass 1A. This is an example of how badly these budget formulas need to be updated. Learn more at KeepJeffcoSafe.com.

Please email me at chris@kennedy4co.com if you have questions about these ballot measures or anything else!

September Update

Well, it’s been another busy summer!

I’ll admit that I’ve made some time to get up into the mountains and enjoy our beautiful state, but I’ve also had plenty of work to keep me going. In addition to general meetings about constituent and policy issues that we might address next session, I’m serving on two interim committees that are each diving deep into big topics.

First, I’m in my third summer on the Opioid and Other Substance Use Disorders committee in which we’re continuing our work to improve prevention, treatment, and recovery services in Colorado. Second, I’m on the Investor-Owned Utility committee in which we are looking at the regulations that govern Xcel Energy and other IOUs to ensure we’re maximizing progress on moving toward clean energy while consumers are protected from any unfair billing practices.

It’s an interesting experience to get involved in so many diverse topics, and I continue to be grateful you all elected me to this crazy job.

One last thing. The Lakewood delegation will be resuming our monthly town halls this month, starting Saturday. September 21st at 10:00am at the West Metro Fire HQ (433 S Allison Pkwy, Lakewood). We’ve invited all of the 2019 Jeffco School Board candidates and the supporting and opposing campaigns for statewide and countywide ballot measures (CC, DD, & 1A).

Our next meetings will be on October 19th and November 16th, same time and location. Then we’ll skip December and start up again in January.

I hope to see you at one or more of the town halls, but if you can’t make it, you can always email me to share your thoughts and questions!

Why I’m Voting No on Lakewood Ballot Question 200

Why I’m Voting No on Lakewood Ballot Question 200

For several years now, growth has been the number one issue I’ve heard about as I knock on doors across Lakewood. People are worried about population growth and what it means for our historically underfunded schools and transportation infrastructure. We have all seen the traffic congestion on highways like 6th Avenue and C-470 and thoroughfares like Wadsworth, Kipling, Union, Colfax, and Alameda, and we don’t want it to get worse.

Lakewood has a long tradition of developing plans in a collaborative way, moving slowly and taking community feedback every step of the way. That’s how we ended up with our Comprehensive Plan, Sustainability Plan, and several other community plans. And that’s what’s driving our current Development Dialogue, which has already led to many changes in how the city deals with development.

This week, Lakewood voters will receive mail ballots asking them whether to support Ballot Question 200. I’m voting no, and I hope you do too. Though I share many of the proponents’ concerns about growth in our city, I feel that passing Question 200 won’t stop growth – it will just increase sprawl and make Lakewood’s housing affordability and traffic problems worse.

We already have a shortage of affordable housing that can only be solved by true strategic planning. If passed, Question 200 will make it much more difficult to build new affordable housing and will drive up rents and property taxes for people who already live here.

For the teachers, police officers, firefighters, young professionals, and others who work in Lakewood but can’t afford to live here, Question 200 will mean they have to drive in from somewhere else. That means more cars driving in and out of Lakewood every day, and thus more congestion on our roads.

So if not in Lakewood, then where? I’ve had constituents suggest that growth can just happen east of Aurora, but that’s just not realistic. If people are working in Lakewood, they’re not going to want an hour commute every day. That means increasing demand for developments in unincorporated Jefferson County that would sprawl out across the undeveloped spaces that contribute to our views of the foothills.

That’s really the choice we face. If we pass Question 200, we make Lakewood less affordable and increase sprawl and congestion. If we defeat it, we can resume our thoughtful, collaborative, and strategic planning process for the future.

I believe that we all want Lakewood to be a community accessible to young families, seniors, and everyone in between. I believe we all want to protect our beautiful parks, open spaces, and views. I believe we all want safe neighborhoods and great public schools. I believe we all enjoy having a growing number of unique restaurants, breweries, stores, and other amenities right here in our own city.

And how about the revitalization that has begun on West Colfax? I have loved seeing the emergence of art galleries and the facelift on the old JCRS shopping center, but we’re still seeing too many vacant units that could be filled by a new restaurant or store. And many of northeast Lakewood’s residents have to drive a couple miles to reach the nearest grocery store, which can be a real problem if you don’t have a car.

Why is that? It’s because businesses won’t move into areas that don’t have enough residents. New multi-family housing in northeast Lakewood – one of the growth areas designated in the Comprehensive Plan – could make a big difference in continuing the West Colfax renaissance.

What if we had a new restaurant row on Colfax instead of the growing number of storage units? Or retail establishments other than dollar stores? What if we could be sure that our kids will be able to afford to raise their families here? And that our parents will be able to retire here?

If we want to be thoughtful and strategic about growth, we must push our city council to continue the Development Dialogue, taking community feedback as they plan the right ways to grow. Passing Question 200 will not make growth more strategic – it will only increase sprawl and congestion while making Lakewood a less affordable place to live. Please join me in voting no.

Learn more at OurLakewood.com.