Why I’m Voting No on Lakewood Ballot Question 200

Why I’m Voting No on Lakewood Ballot Question 200

For several years now, growth has been the number one issue I’ve heard about as I knock on doors across Lakewood. People are worried about population growth and what it means for our historically underfunded schools and transportation infrastructure. We have all seen the traffic congestion on highways like 6th Avenue and C-470 and thoroughfares like Wadsworth, Kipling, Union, Colfax, and Alameda, and we don’t want it to get worse.

Lakewood has a long tradition of developing plans in a collaborative way, moving slowly and taking community feedback every step of the way. That’s how we ended up with our Comprehensive Plan, Sustainability Plan, and several other community plans. And that’s what’s driving our current Development Dialogue, which has already led to many changes in how the city deals with development.

This week, Lakewood voters will receive mail ballots asking them whether to support Ballot Question 200. I’m voting no, and I hope you do too. Though I share many of the proponents’ concerns about growth in our city, I feel that passing Question 200 won’t stop growth – it will just increase sprawl and make Lakewood’s housing affordability and traffic problems worse.

We already have a shortage of affordable housing that can only be solved by true strategic planning. If passed, Question 200 will make it much more difficult to build new affordable housing and will drive up rents and property taxes for people who already live here.

For the teachers, police officers, firefighters, young professionals, and others who work in Lakewood but can’t afford to live here, Question 200 will mean they have to drive in from somewhere else. That means more cars driving in and out of Lakewood every day, and thus more congestion on our roads.

So if not in Lakewood, then where? I’ve had constituents suggest that growth can just happen east of Aurora, but that’s just not realistic. If people are working in Lakewood, they’re not going to want an hour commute every day. That means increasing demand for developments in unincorporated Jefferson County that would sprawl out across the undeveloped spaces that contribute to our views of the foothills.

That’s really the choice we face. If we pass Question 200, we make Lakewood less affordable and increase sprawl and congestion. If we defeat it, we can resume our thoughtful, collaborative, and strategic planning process for the future.

I believe that we all want Lakewood to be a community accessible to young families, seniors, and everyone in between. I believe we all want to protect our beautiful parks, open spaces, and views. I believe we all want safe neighborhoods and great public schools. I believe we all enjoy having a growing number of unique restaurants, breweries, stores, and other amenities right here in our own city.

And how about the revitalization that has begun on West Colfax? I have loved seeing the emergence of art galleries and the facelift on the old JCRS shopping center, but we’re still seeing too many vacant units that could be filled by a new restaurant or store. And many of northeast Lakewood’s residents have to drive a couple miles to reach the nearest grocery store, which can be a real problem if you don’t have a car.

Why is that? It’s because businesses won’t move into areas that don’t have enough residents. New multi-family housing in northeast Lakewood – one of the growth areas designated in the Comprehensive Plan – could make a big difference in continuing the West Colfax renaissance.

What if we had a new restaurant row on Colfax instead of the growing number of storage units? Or retail establishments other than dollar stores? What if we could be sure that our kids will be able to afford to raise their families here? And that our parents will be able to retire here?

If we want to be thoughtful and strategic about growth, we must push our city council to continue the Development Dialogue, taking community feedback as they plan the right ways to grow. Passing Question 200 will not make growth more strategic – it will only increase sprawl and congestion while making Lakewood a less affordable place to live. Please join me in voting no.

Learn more at OurLakewood.com.

Female representation matters. Colorado’s legislature proves that.

Female representation matters. Colorado’s legislature proves that.

By Karen Tumulty (April 12th, 2019)

The corridors of the gold-domed state capitol here are lined with busts and portraits showing what political power used to look like in Colorado. Nearly without exception, the figures depicted in that artwork are male.

But step onto the floor of the Colorado House, and you’ll see something entirely different. In the current legislative session, more than half of the state representatives — 34 out of 65 — are women. Seven of the 11 House committees are chaired by women.

Only once before and only briefly has any legislature in the country experienced a female majority in even one of its chambers. It happened in New Hampshire, where women held 13 out of 24 seats in the state Senate during the 2009-2010 session.

A decade later, there are two: Colorado and Nevada, where women not only constitute a majority in the Assembly, but also hold most of the seats in the legislature as a whole.

This is not just the aftereffect of the 2018 election, which saw record numbers of women running for office. Colorado’s groundswell for more female representation has been building for years, fueled by organizations such as the state chapter of Emerge America, which operates a sort of boot camp for women interested in running at the state and local level.Opinion | This exchange between a Democrat and a CEO should shape the 2020 campaigns

Rep. Katie Porter (D-Calif.) grills JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon, who made $31 million last year, on how a low-paid bank teller is supposed to pay the bills. (Danielle Kunitz, Joshua Carroll/The Washington Post)

Kathleen Collins “KC” Becker, who got her start on the Boulder City Council, is the third woman in a row to serve as House speaker. “We very diligently recruit women, and train women to run, and hire women as campaign managers,” she said in an interview in her offices just off the chamber. “And so, all of this is intentional. It didn’t just happen that way.”

This year has also seen a record number of women in Colorado’s state Senate, 13 out of a membership of 35. Well over half the agency heads appointed by its new governor, Jared Polis (D), are female.

Read Full Story at WashingtonPost.com

Colorado opioid fight stretches from Denver to D.C.

Colorado opioid fight stretches from Denver to D.C.

By Joey Bunch (May 24th, 2019)

The campaign to curb opioid deaths stretched from Denver to Washington, D.C., this week, as Gov. Jared Polis signed new state laws and U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet introduced get-tough legislation on Capitol Hill.

At the Sobriety House treatment facility in Denver Thursday afternoon, Polis signed:

  • Senate Bill 8, to address substance use disorder treatment in the criminal justice system. The bill was sponsored by state Reps. Chris Kennedy, D-Lakewood, and Jonathan Singer, D-Longmont, with Sens. Kevin Priola, R-Henderson, and Brittany Pettersen, D-Lakewood.
  • House Bill 1009to provide support for those  recovering from substance use disorders, providing vouchers for housing assistance to some, creating standards for recovery residences and creating the Opioid Crisis Recovery Funds Advisory Committee. The bill was sponsored by Kennedy, Singer, Priola and Pettersen.
  • Senate Bill 19-227, a sweeping piece of legislation aimed at getting drug-overdose medication into schools, expanding the state’s drug take-back program and getting automated external defibrillator devices into more buildings. The bill was sponsored by Pettersen; Kennedy; Sen. Julie Gonzales, D-Denver; and Rep. Leslie Herod, D-Denver.
  • Senate Bill 228, to provide training and other measures for prescribers to address supply of opiates. The bill was sponsored by Singer; Sens. Faith Winter, D-Westminister; Dominick Moreno, D-Commerce City; and Rep. Bri Buentello, D-Pueblo.
  • Senate Bill 219, to reauthorize the Colorado Licensing Of Controlled Substances Act with a new requirement to separate the administration of the act from duties relating to treatment facilities that receive public funds. Changes also call for an online central registry for licensed opioid treatment programs to submit information to the state Department of Human Services. The bill was sponsored by Pettersen and Rep. Serena Gonzales-Gutierrez, D-Denver.

“This law is focused on people who are going through substance use recovery and are at the end of that spectrum,” Kennedy said in a statement. “Through this bill, we are trying to reintegrate these folks back into the community and break down the barriers they face, like access to housing.”

Singer stated: “The majority of people with a substance use disorder are currently in recovery today. Supporting recovery is the right thing to do, costing the state far less in the long run. This will play a huge role in ending the opioid crisis.”

On May 16 the governor signed Senate Bill 13, which makes any condition for which an opiate has been prescribed eligible for medical marijuana.

Meanwhile in Washington this week, Bennet introduced bipartisan legislation to hold opioid makers more directly accountable for the addiction crisis caused by their products.

Besides extracting more money from drug makers, the Opioid Crisis Accountability Act would hold top company officials criminally liable for violations, while toughening laws on illegal marketing and distribution.

Read Full Story at ColoradoPolitics.com

Delivering on promises

Last Friday, the 2019 Legislative Session came to a close with a list of accomplishments that the Denver Post said would ensure the session’s legacy as “one of the most transformative in decades.”

It’s amazing how quickly 120 days go by. As soon as we learned the results of the 2018 election, we began crafting an agenda based on the concerns we heard and the promises we made while on the campaign trail. Then there was the drafting and stakeholding and revising and moving bills through committee meetings and floor debates. And then it was over!

Here’s what I heard on the trail: Lower the cost of health care. Invest in education, transportation, and affordable housing. Accelerate the transition to clean energy. Make our schools safer. Expand mental health access. Stand up for the rights of every Coloradan – voting rights, reproductive rights, rights to self expression, and more. Protect the clean air, clean water, and beautiful open spaces that make Colorado such a special place to live.

And those are the things we put most of our energy into over the last 120 days. Check out this recap of the session to learn more.

I am so proud of the work we did this session, and now I’m going to relax a little and start getting caught up on yard work before starting to make plans for the 2020 session.

Thanks again for placing your trust in me.

P.S.  Before too long, I have to start fundraising again for my 2020 reelection campaign. If you want to get a head start, you can donate here!

Colorado Democrats deliver on major changes to health care, education and the environment in dramatic session

Colorado Democrats deliver on major changes to health care, education and the environment in dramatic session

By Nic Garcia (May 3, 2019)

Democratic lawmakers ended their work reshaping Colorado on Friday, delivering on most of their campaign promises before the giant rubber band ball fell to mark the end of the session.

Sweeping changes on education, health care and the environment, coupled with a host of social policy changes such as a ban on gay conversion therapy and new gun control legislation, ensure the 2019 legislative session will be remembered as one of the most transformative in decades.

The General Assembly adjourned Friday night after one of the most conflict-filled legislative sessions in recent memory. The 120 days were punctuated with late nightslong-winded debate and lawsuits.

Nevertheless, Democrats, who had complete control of the legislative agenda for the first time in four years, and Gov. Jared Polis were able to pass legislation they believe will drive down the cost of health carepay for full-day kindergarten and overhaul regulations for the oil and gas industry.

“This is what we ran on,” said state Sen. Julie Gonzales, a Denver Democrat and freshman lawmaker. “This is the transformative policy we fought for.”

Read Full Story at DenverPost.com

House names portion of highway for teacher killed at Columbine

Yesterday we honored the memory of Dave Sanders who gave his life to protect his students at Columbine High School. My cousin was one of the students who made it out thanks to Mr. Sanders and I am grateful that we passed this resolution to honor a true hero.

By Joey Bunch (May 03, 2019)

C-470 from West Bowles Avenue to South Platte Canyon Road in Jefferson County will soon remind commuters of heroism in the face of the Columbine High School massacre 20 years ago.

The Colorado House unanimously approved renaming the seven-mile stretch near the high school the Dave Sanders Memorial Highway Thursday.

The resolution was sponsored by House Republican leader Patrick Neville, who was a student at Columbine that day, and Rep. Tom Sullivan, a Democrat from Centennial whose son Alex was killed in the Aurora theater shooting in 2012.

“I’m watching my future play out in front of me with each anniversary of Columbine,” Sullivan said.

Rep. Colin Larson, R-Littleton, represents the district where the high school is located. He remembered being just a few miles away at his home on April 20, 1999, when two students killed Sanders and 12 students were gunned down.

“It’s a little strange it took 20 years,” the freshman legislator said of the memorial for Sanders. “But this will be a good thing for our community. Everyone who goes to Columbine and the Ken Caryl area will see this highway every day and be reminded of a great man and great hero.”

Sanders was shot in the back as he herded students to safety and bled to death before rescuers could arrive.

Rep. Chris Kennedy, D-Lakewood, read a letter from his cousin Mike Rotolo, who was holed up in a a science classroom where Sanders died.

Rotolo recalled how Sanders told them to tell his daughters he loved them.

“That day Dave Sanders showed me and a science classroom full of 16-year-olds what true love is — selfless, unconditional love. That is what I choose to remember,” Kennedy said, reading from the letter.

Neville recalled his freshman computer teacher’s patience trying to teach him to type, to focus on the fundamentals even if it slowed him down until he mastered the skill.

Neville said he tries to channel that patience over his natural stubbornness still.

“I’m humbled that I’m in a position to be part of this,” he told the House.

Then he led a chant. Neville said, “We are …” and lawmakers from across Colorado added “Columbine.”

All 65 members of the House added their names as co-sponsors of the resolution.

Read full story at ColoradoPolitics.com

New legislation aims to tackle opioid crisis in Colorado

New legislation aims to tackle opioid crisis in Colorado

By Faith Miller (May 1, 2019)

In 2017, a group of Colorado legislators first convened the Opioid and Other Substance Use Disorders Interim Study Committee — or “opioid summer camp,” as Dr. Robert Valuck calls it.

For the last two summers while the Assembly was on recess, the lawmakers studied the opioid crisis and worked with experts like Valuck to develop legislation.

“None of these people voted straight party-line stuff,” says Valuck, who directs the Colorado Consortium for Prescription Drug Abuse Prevention and spoke at a recent conference on opioids. “It was really like, ‘Look, is this a sensible thing to be doing or not? … And is it going to really affect Coloradans in a positive way? Then let’s do it. If not, then don’t.’”

Below, we highlight several bills addressing the opioid crisis, all of which (excepting Senate Bill 013) came out of that “opioid summer camp.”

House Bill 1009

This bill, titled “Substance Use Disorders Recovery,” would expand the state’s housing voucher program to include people with substance use disorders. It would also require that recovery facilities have a state license, and create an “opioid crisis recovery fund” for settlement money the state receives from suing pill manufacturers.

Sponsored by Reps. Chris Kennedy, D-Lakewood, and Jonathan Singer, D-Longmont, the bill passed the House on April 27 and headed to the Senate, where Sens. Kevin Priola, R-Henderson, and Brittany Pettersen, D-Lakewood, are sponsors.

House Bill 1287

“Treatment for Opioids and Substance Use Disorders” would direct the Department of Human Services to implement an online behavioral health capacity tracking system, which would show available spots at mental health facilities and substance use treatment programs across the state. It would also create a grant program to fund substance use treatment programs in underserved areas of the state.

The bill passed the House, and was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee on April 29. It’s sponsored by Reps. Daneya Esgar, D-Pueblo, and James Wilson, R-Fremont County, along with Sens. Priola and Pettersen.

Senate Bill 008

“Substance Use Disorder Treatment in Criminal Justice System,” also sponsored by Priola and Pettersen, would allow people who had been receiving medication-assisted substance use treatment in a local jail to continue that treatment after being transferred to the state Department of Corrections. It would also create a simplified process for sealing certain drug felonies, and jump-start additional responses to addressing substance use in the criminal justice system.

Reps. Kennedy and Singer are House sponsors. The bill passed the Senate and the House, but the Senate must approve amendments. 

Senate Bill 013

“Medical Marijuana Condition Opioids Prescribed For” would add any condition for which doctors would normally prescribe an opioid to the list of “disabling conditions” that qualify for medical marijuana. Minors would need the approval of two doctors, and couldn’t smoke their prescription on school grounds.

The bill passed the Senate on Feb. 12, and the House on April 29. Sponsors include Sens. Vicki Marble, R-Fort Collins, and Joann Ginal, D-Fort Collins, along with Reps. Edie Hooton, D-Boulder, and Kim Ransom, R-Littleton.

Senate Bill 227

“Harm Reduction Substance Use Disorders” would explicitly authorize schools to carry naloxone, a drug that can reverse opioid overdoses. It would also allow hospitals to serve as syringe exchange sites, expand the household medication take-back program, and create mobile response teams to provide medication-assisted substance use treatment in jails.

The bill was sponsored by Pettersen and Sen. Julie Gonzales, D-Denver. In the House, it was sponsored by Kennedy, along with Rep. Leslie Herod, D-Denver. The bill passed and was sent to the governor.

Read Full Story at CSIndy.com

Colorado governor’s office unveils roadmap for saving Coloradans money on health care

Colorado governor’s office unveils roadmap for saving Coloradans money on health care

By Meghan Lopez & Blair Miller (April 4th, 2019)

DENVER – Colorado’s governor, lieutenant governor and a host of lawmakers and health care stakeholders on Thursday detailed the roadmap they plan to follow in order to try and reduce the cost of health care services across the state.

“Too many Coloradans have to worry about caring for themselves or a loved one, as well as whether or not they can pay the bills,” Lt. Gov. Dianne Primavera said. “Our roadmap puts us on a path toward lower health care costs for all Coloradans.”

Primavera is leading the Office of Saving People Money on Health Care. She and Gov. Jared Polis laid out a series of bills and other initiatives – both short- and long-term – they say will help keep costs down for Coloradans.

They praised the steps already taken in the state to reduce uninsured rates from nearly 16% in 2013 to 6.5% this year. But said that the falling uninsured rates haven’t led to lower costs, particularly in mountain counties and other rural parts of the state.

Polis praised the legislature’s passage of HB19-1001, the hospital price transparency bill that aims to study the cost of care in Colorado. He also urged lawmakers from both parties to back some of the measures he is supporting this session, including the establishment of a reinsurance pool, more regulations of certain emergency rooms, and a Canadian prescription drug importation program, among others.

Aside from the short-term goals, the governor’s office said some of its long-term goals including launching a state-backed health insurance option and expanding the rural health care workforce and behavioral health system across the state. Polis said the Behavioral Health Task Force would be established this month and would have a strategic plan statewide by June 2020.

Read Full Story at TheDenverChannel.com

OPINION | While D.C. dithers over health care, Colorado offers common-sense solutions

By Chris Kennedy (March 26, 2019)

Years ago folks right here in Colorado and across the country found common ground in the fact that they were paying too much for too little health care coverage — if they were able to qualify for coverage at all. Momentum was building and change was coming, manifesting in the Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law nine years ago this month to bring the nation’s health care system in line with needs of consumers across the country. 

The ACA was arguably one of the most influential, significant and far-reaching pieces of health care legislation of the 21st century. The bill was by no means a cure-all. But in Colorado we have been working to continue improving the state’s health care system in the spirit of reducing costs and increasing access for all.

Gov. Jared Polis recently created the Office for Saving People Money on Health Care by executive order. We are working on bills to create an affordable state health care option, stop surprise billing, prevent the sale of junk insurance plans and more. We are proud to say that in the 2019 legislative session our state is working to provide some welcome hope and opportunity for advocates for affordable, high-quality health care like myself. 

For many of the folks I speak to in my district, it’s that affordable piece that has been hard to come by. That’s why I sponsored House Bill 1001, along with Sens. Dominick Moreno and Bob Rankin, which is now heading for the governor’s desk to be signed into law. 

This bipartisan bill requires hospitals to disclose the actual costs of many of their expenditures to provide transparency and help lower costs for consumers. Hospital care currently accounts for about 40 percent of the total health care costs in the state.These annual financial reports will be compiled by the Department of Health Care Policy and Financing, along with the Colorado Healthcare Affordability and Sustainability Enterprise Boards.

After a review process, these reports would be publicly available to help patients and policy makers have a better understanding of where money is going. This type of accountability and financial insight will be particularly helpful in determining how to reduce costs in rural communities where health care costs are skyrocketing. It will also provide information around the rates hospitals are charging patients with insurance versus the uninsured. Finally, employers and insurance carriers can also use this data to choose the most efficient hospitals to contract with and pass the savings along to employees and individuals.

We are also hopeful that requiring hospitals to reveal additional background on their staffing and operating overhead will increase competition in the industry and help consumers make more informed choices. Many other industries already have similar requirements that have driven innovative solutions to increase efficiency and drive down costs. 

At a time when politicians in Washington D.C., have been working tirelessly to roll back critical health care provisions like the ACA, I’m very proud to be a lawmaker in a state like Colorado where we are working to make health care more accessible and transparent — not less. All that’s needed is lawmakers to come to the table to find common-sense solutions that improve the health care system for all Coloradans — and all Americans.

Read full story at ColoradoPolitics.com

HD 23 Day at the Capitol

Last year, Colorado voters elected Democratic majorities in both the House and the Senate because we campaigned on supporting education, protecting our environment, addressing the high cost of health care, standing up for the most vulnerable among us, and much more.

And over the last 78 days, that’s exactly what we’ve been doing down at the capitol. Here are a few recent highlights:

Oh yeah, and the hospital cost transparency bill I’ve been working on since 2017 is on its way to the governor’s desk to be signed into law!

If you want to see how this all happens from the inside, join us next Wednesday, March 27th, for our HD23 Day at the Capitol. See the agenda and RSVP on Facebook or email my aide, Ryne Fitzgerald, at ryne@kennedy4co.com.