Cigarettes all over again? Colorado has the highest youth vaping rate in the country.

Cigarettes all over again? Colorado has the highest youth vaping rate in the country.

By Jennifer Brown (Feb 27th, 2019)

Jim Lynch mastered the fake yawn, stretching out his arm and bringing it to his mouth during class, then pausing to pull a drag from the Juul tucked up the sleeve of his sweatshirt. The high school junior held the vapor in his mouth for 10 seconds, waiting for it to evaporate before he took another breath.

It’s called “ghosting,” and the result is no vapor puff. No scent of mint or mango, his go-to Juul flavors.  

All was cool until the day Lynch, a student at Wheat Ridge High School, got caught by his choir teacher, who returned to the room sooner than expected and in time to see Lynch exhale a cloud. The otherwise well-behaved kid got an afternoon of detention. 

Colorado has the highest rate of vaping teenagers in the nation at 27 percent, double the national average, according to the Healthy Kids Colorado Survey. Local communities — particularly in mountain and rural towns, where rates are the worst — are desperate to take matters into their own hands. 

Legislation nearly to the governor’s desk could give them far broader powers, including the authority to raise the legal age for sale of nicotine products to 21 and require stores to purchase licenses in order to sell cigarettes or vape products.

“If an adult wants to smoke, that is their business,” said Rick Ritter, executive director of the Otero County Health Department in Southern Colorado. “But it is illegal for kids to smoke. They don’t make the smartest decisions. They think what they do now will not affect them later in life. My message is, it will.”

After Lynch got caught by his teacher, the 17-year-old knew it was time to kick the habit he’d started in eighth grade, when a friend offered him a smoke as they walked home from school. He was buying Juul pods online for about $10 each, going through one pod about every three days. 

“My thoughts were, ‘When is the next time I can step outside and smoke or go to the bathroom to Juul,’ ” said Lynch, who quit two months ago. “I stopped focusing on what I wanted to do after school.” 

Each pod contains as much nicotine as a pack of cigarettes. But when Lynch’s dad found out he was vaping, the teen told him it was just flavored smoke with no nicotine — and his dad believed him. Lynch told his father he only did it to look cool, and that part was no lie.

“It’s 100 percent one of the things to do to be cool and fit in,” he said.

Read Full Story at ColoradoSun.com

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