Colorado House District 23 candidate Q&A

By the Denver Post (October 10th, 2018)

Why are you running for office?
I believe that everyone who works hard and does their fair share should have a fair shot to get ahead and enjoy the Colorado way of life. Though our economy is booming, the rapid growth and high cost of living are making it hard for too many Colorado families to get by. I believe we must do more to make sure our economic growth benefits everybody – not just the folks at the top.

What three policy issues set you apart from your opponent(s)?
I can’t speak to my opponent’s policy positions, but I believe my commitment to LGBTQ rights, reproductive freedom, and fighting climate change are likely contrasting positions. I also believe we need to do more to fund education, transportation, affordable housing, mental health, and other priorities in Colorado. That means we must demonstrate to Colorado voters that we are making responsible decisions with their tax dollars and ask them to consider raising their own taxes to fund these key priorities. We can’t cut our way to prosperity.

What are the biggest areas of agreement between you and your opponent(s)?
The one time I’ve heard my opponent speak, she praised some of Jeffco’s nonprofits for the important work they’re doing in our community. I couldn’t agree more. The partnerships between government and the nonprofit world are critical to providing the services that so many Coloradans depend on.

Where would you like to see Colorado’s transportation system in two decades, and what’s the best way to get there? What’s your position on the competing state transportation initiatives?
While we need to do more to repair and expand our roads and bridges, we must also recognize that increasing transit options and bike paths are important parts of the whole. I strongly support Proposition 110, which increased our sales tax by 0.62% to fund infrastructure investments. I strongly oppose Proposition 109, which essentially forces the legislature to make deep cuts in education and health care in order to fund transportation.

What role, if any, should the state legislature play in managing the impact of growth along the Front Range and ensuring that rural areas share in the benefits?
Growth is the number one concern I hear about when I’m knocking on doors. While we may not be able to control growth, we can certainly stop incentivizing it by trying to attract big companies to relocate here. We must figure out how to make growth pay its own way so that it doesn’t put so much strain on our roads, neighborhoods, and available housing.

Colorado’s health insurance exchange and Medicaid expansion have given hundreds of thousands more residents coverage, but health care remains a top concern in state polls. Affordability and access are particularly challenging in remote areas. Where should the state go on this issue, and what will you do to get us there?
The Affordable Care Act did a lot to expand access so that more people could get health insurance, but by building on top of a broken system, little was done to control costs. We must push further on ideas like cost transparency for hospitals and pharmaceuticals while taking steps away from the fee-for-service system and moving closer to a value-based payment system. We must also work on insurance reforms that will allow everyone in the state to access insurance with reasonable premiums and deductibles. To do that, we need to explore either a reinsurance program, and public option, or both.


Joan Poston has not returned the questionnaire.

Read the full story at DenverPost.com

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